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Build an Intel i7 or Ryzen 7 Gaming PC for Under $1,500 2017

Updated on June 7, 2017
If you have a budget of under $1500, what hardware should you purchase for your gaming PC? Here's a look at the parts that I feel give you the most value right now.
If you have a budget of under $1500, what hardware should you purchase for your gaming PC? Here's a look at the parts that I feel give you the most value right now.

Whether you're part of team AMD or Intel this year, the type of build you can get for a budget of $1,500 in 2017 is nothing short of amazing. Improvements over the last several years mean that ultra settings gaming in 1440p can be achieved at this price point.

If you're planning on building a computer for $1,500, here's a look at the parts we'd choose along with an explanation for each. You can either build a PC exactly like this one or modify it to fit your needs. Either way, we'll get you updated with all the latest information you'll need along the way.

I do a lot of video and photo editing so to me, an i7  more than pays for itself. That being said an i5 is all that's needed for a rig used exclusively for gaming.
I do a lot of video and photo editing so to me, an i7 more than pays for itself. That being said an i5 is all that's needed for a rig used exclusively for gaming.

I7-7700k vs Ryzen 7 1700

At this price point, I recommend you go for a processor in the $300 range. So, it really comes down to the Ryzen 7 1700 and the i7 7700k. A colleague of mine did a comparison of these two processors and I was somewhat shocked with the result.

First of all, if you're going with a Ryzen CPU, there's not a ton of difference between the Ryzen 7 1700 model and the 1800x in terms of gaming. This is especially true if you overclock it.

Against the Intel Core i7-7700k the Ryzen 7 1700 does lose a few frames in games. So, if you're only purpose is to game, the i7-7700k is probably the better choice. That being said, the more cores that games utilize going forward, the better the Ryzen 7 1700 will do. In addition, the 8 cores and 16 threads of the Ryzen 7 1700 make it a better workhorse CPU than the i7-7700k and its 4 cores and 8 threads.

Overall:

In terms of the AMD Ryzen 7 1700, a few people have written it off because it has slower Instructions per clock than Kaby Lake. That being said, it's still very fast. So, if you could use the extra cores, I'd definitely go that route. Additionally, the higher the resolution you play it, the smaller the gap between it and the i7 Intel CPU.

If this is strictly a gaming PC for you, go with the i7 Kaby Lake processor.


Good Graphics Card Options for 1440p

We recently compared the 1080 Ti to the GTX 1080. The 1080 Ti is a worthwhile upgrade for those playing in 1440p or 4k. Pictured: 1080 Ti and 1080 Founder's Edition.
We recently compared the 1080 Ti to the GTX 1080. The 1080 Ti is a worthwhile upgrade for those playing in 1440p or 4k. Pictured: 1080 Ti and 1080 Founder's Edition.

If you're simply playing in 1080p, then an NVIDIA GTX 1080 Ti might be more than what you need. However, a higher frame rate in 1440p or 4k still requires the best. Right now, that's the 1080Ti which is up to 35% faster than the GTX 1080.

This graphics card is nearly half of our $1,500 budget. So, if you'd prefer to save a little bit and go with something less expensive, you can certainly add more storage and cooling options to the build.


A good Z270 Motherboard around $150

If you're looking for a Good Z270 Kaby Lake Motherboard, I've written an in-depth post on my favorites. At around $150 you get good reliability, overclocking potential, and a ton of features in the Asus Z270 Prime.

If you don't need quite as many features you can spend even less and go with the Gigabyte's GA-Z270XP-SLI for around $130. It will work more than fine for most builds.

If you're looking for a motherboard with even more options, I like the Asus IX Hero or any of the Aorus boards around $200.

A Motherboard for the Ryzen 7 1700

If you end up going with the Ryzen 7 1700 processor, you'll need an AM4 compatible motherboard. Most likely, you'll want to go with an X360 board like the Asus Prime. Like the Kaby Lake board, it has a proven track record for quality, features, and overclocking headroom.

ASUS PRIME Z270-A LGA1151 DDR4 DP HDMI DVI M.2 USB 3.1 Z270 ATX Motherboard
ASUS PRIME Z270-A LGA1151 DDR4 DP HDMI DVI M.2 USB 3.1 Z270 ATX Motherboard

The Prime Z270 gives you a good combination of quality and features for around $150.

 

A Good Power Supply Under $100

Regardless of what you end up doing for your build, I highly recommend you spend a bit more on your power supply to get one that I'd consider to be in the top tier. EVGA has the most reasonable option in this tier in its SuperNova G2 Gold Series. I highly recommend the EVGA SuperNova 750 G2.

With good value options from 550W to around 1600W, you're more than likely to find what you're looking for.

If you're looking for an option at a different price point, take a look at my post on the best power supplies for the money by budget.

Best Air and Liquid CPU Coolers Under $100

We've only allocated around $30 of our overall budget to a CPU cooler. The Hyper 212 EVO from Cooler Master does the best job of giving you a decent overclock at that price point. It gives you most of the performance of the most expensive water and fan coolers, but without the inflated price.

If you want to get more performance, then I recommend you jump up to another high-performance cooler like the NZXT Kraken X6. It's a proven winners in many benchmarks.

Overall, I think most are happy with the moderate overclock of the Hyper 212 EVO. It'll get you to 5GHz on the i7 Kaby Lake 7700k and that's probably what most are looking for.

2 Good PC Cases for the Money

I recently wrapped up my post on the best mid-tower gaming cases. Clearly there are a plethora of different case options that would work really well here. Looking at budgets and value for the money you pay, I'll narrow it down to two that I like right now.

If you go with a full-tower Case I'd go with the Phanteks Enthoo Pro. For a smaller case, that's about half the price, I like the Corsair Carbide 200R.

Phanteks Enthoo Pro Full Tower Case

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The Phanteks Enthoo Pro gives you fantastic value in an under $100 full tower case. The internal and external design are top notch. It's also available in black.The hidden power supply adds a sleek dynamic to the overall build.
The Phanteks Enthoo Pro gives you fantastic value in an under $100 full tower case. The internal and external design are top notch. It's also available in black.
The Phanteks Enthoo Pro gives you fantastic value in an under $100 full tower case. The internal and external design are top notch. It's also available in black.
The hidden power supply adds a sleek dynamic to the overall build.
The hidden power supply adds a sleek dynamic to the overall build.

If you're looking for a full tower case with a ton of features that doesn't cost a lot, this is the one to get. While it's a couple of years old now that simply means that it's more tested, more refined, and all for less money than day 1.

The case itself is made of steel and plastic and has a side window for viewing all your hardware.

Expansion and Flexibility

For expansion it has 8 slots and can hold up to 10 120mm fans, 7 140 mm fans, or 2 200mm fans. That's a lot of air! Included with the case are 1 200mm fan in the front and a 140mm fan in the rear. For flexibility the SSD bracket is on a drop and lock system that can be placed in two different locations. Both HDD cages are removable as well.

Corsair Carbide Series 200R Case

For $50 to $60, the Corsair series 200R case has  a lot going for it.
For $50 to $60, the Corsair series 200R case has a lot going for it.

If you prefer to go with something cheaper and more compact than a full-sized tower, I like Corsair's Carbide model 200R. It's a black steel and plastic case with plenty of airflow and expansion slots.

Corsair makes it Easy

I've done several builds in Corsair cases over the years and they always make it easy. Knowing the build doesn't take very long makes it easier to setup and upgrade in the future. The 200R has thumbscrews for the SSD, hard drive, an optical drives making it a tool-free setup.

Expansion and Compatibility

The 200R has seven PCI-E slots all with thumbscrews and allows for a GPU of up to 430mm long. CPU Coolers up to 160mm in height fit and the side panels can hold up to 8 fan mounts. The case comes with 2 x 120mm fans.

Summary:

Overall, this is one of the better cases you'll find in the $50 range. It's sturdy, makes it easy to install, and has plenty of expansion. Find it on rebate for sub $50 pricing.

Storage Options

In the past, I'd skimp on storage options to get every bit of raw performance I could out of my gaming PC. Now, I opt for a good amount of storage as I understand just how important it is.

A solid state drive here is a must here. If you play multiplayer it loads maps faster and in real life performance, it's just about as important as any component I can think of.

I've gone with the Kingston SSD Now V300 series for its reliability, speed, and low price. I've purchased several of these over the last year and typically go with this model unless the Samsung EVO series is cheaper.

For Hard drive, we're going with the Hitachi Deskstar 7200RPM 2TB hard drive. It's regularly on sale for around $60 and for $10 more than the popular Caviar Blue 1 TB model from WD, gives you twice as much storage. If you store as many videos, shows, photos, and files as I do on your PC, then that extra storage will be something you're glad to have.

DDR4 Memory Options

If you're moving from a DDR3 rig, unfortunately, you won't be able to use what you already have. Still, you should be able to use what you buy here in your next few upgrades.

With how cheap memory is these days, I can't imagine building a PC at this price range and not throwing at least 16GB of memory at it.

With either the Haswell-e or Skylake versions of this build, you'll need DDR4. Having done some testing on overclocking and performance, I can tell you that anything around 2400MHz is going to get the job done in terms of gaming performance and DDR4.

I especially like the Corsair Vengeance LPX series. It's inexpensive, good quality, and overclocks super well.

Why You Should Build Your Own Custom Computer

When you think about the parts you'd want to put in your PC with a budget of $1500, there's a lot of expectations. You'd expect a quality 80 Plus power supply with room to upgrade and overclock if you wanted. The manufacturer of a pre-built machine wants to give you the bare minimum of what you need.

For the motherboard, you'd pick exactly what you wanted. Either a motherboard with plenty of features, overclocking headroom, or perhaps one that didn't cost a lot.

If you let someone else take over, then you're allowing them to make all the big decisions. In terms of quality, it's a bit of a crap shoot on what you'll get.

With all of this being said, my point is that you should just build your own PC. If you've never done it before, then hopefully I can help you pick out the parts that will give you the best overall value. Putting the parts together is actually rather simple. The best way to get going is to just order the parts, get started, and grab a friend if you need help. I can answer any other questions you may have below.

$1250 to $1500 PC Build With Options

Part
$1250 Build
*$1500 Build Upgrade and Downgrade Options
CPU
Intel i7-7700k
i7-7700k
CPU Cooler
Hyper 212 Evo
Hyper 212 Evo, H100i (+$70)
Motherboard
Asus Z270 Prime
Asus Z270 Prime
Memory
Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x4GB 2666MHz
Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x8GB 3000MHz (+$40)
SSD
A-Data Premier SP550 240GB SSD
A-Data Premier SP550 240GB SSD
Hard Drive
WD 1 TB Caviar Blue
WD 1 TB Caviar Blue
GPU
GTX 1070 or 1080
GTX 1080 Ti
Case
Corsair 200R
Phanteks Enthoo Pro (+$30)
PSU
EVGA SuperNova NEX 650W
EVGA SuperNova NEX 650W
*Not all additional features can be added on to maintain a $1500 budget. However, upgrading to a GTX 1080 Ti is entirely possible within this price range.

Final Thoughts, AMD vs NVIDIA in 2016, and Summary

Whether this is your first PC or you're simply looking to upgrade, hopefully I've helped you along the way in your decision process. I strongly feel that NVIDIA's Pascal is the way to go this year.

That being said AMD is releasing their Pascal based GPUs in time for the back to school rush of August and September. With NVIDIA striking first in 2016, it's possible that AMD will have a solid answer. Then again, I can't help but think of the GTX 980 and the way it used the 980 Ti when it needed to respond to a potential threat from AMD.

Here's hoping that in 2016 we'll get some better competition.

Summary:

If you'd like more options and more builds, I highly recommend you take a look at my build a gaming PC series on YouTube. Some of it gets a bit out of date from time to time but I typically redo all of my builds each quarter.

My $1500 Build YouTube Video:

You can go to my YouTube Channel for an alternate version of this build where I do a little more of a mainstream build. I've also posted my $300 to $2000 builds there as well as here.

If you're looking for an always up-to-date version of the build above you can also see my page on the top gaming computers for 2016. It includes 10 builds from $200 to $2500 that are frequently updated.

Should you Go SLI?

Potential Advantages of SLI

Better performance for your money. While this may not have completely been true in years past it's definitely true right now. The reason for this is that scaling has gotten better. By that, I simply mean that if you use two cards in SLI you can get closer to double the performance of a single card than ever before. In addition, it works really well with multiple monitor configurations.

Disadvantages of SLI

There are still a lot of disadvantages to SLI in 2016. When you have two graphics cards side by side in a case it uses more power and can get a bit hot from time to time. Also, not every game supports dual card configurations. That being said, most graphically intense games like Battlefield 4 provide support for this and AMD and NVIDIA provide driver updates regularly. In addition, micro stuttering can occur on occasion although, this is very limited on NVIDIA's newer cards.

Thoughts about Dual Card Configurations:

Starting out with a single card can also be advantageous if you want to SLI or Crossfire down the line. For example, if I bought a GTX 1070 today, then I could purchase another GTX 1070 years from now for a discount and save myself from having to upgrade.

That being said if you go with a dual card configuration for a similar budget, you're likely to get better performance right now. Either way, it's really a matter of personal preference, but with SLI configurations getting simpler, it'll probably become a more popular option over the next couple of years.

Open Discussion Area

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    • profile image

      Sahir 3 years ago

      Truly speaking from all this PC business,

      I started building my PC in the beginning of 2005 with a Pentium IV and now it's evolved to a PC which runs everything smooth. Don't know about FPS or benchmarks but everything works.

      My current setup is:

      Q6600 at stock speed CPU - $60 from Ebay

      Radeon HD5750 1 GB XFX GPU - $160 from Ebay

      2 x 4 GB Kingston DDR3 RAM - cheap

      OCZ Stealth X Stream 600W PSU - $150 from a local shop

      ASRock microatx mobo supporting the CPU socket and DDR3 RAM - $65 from a local shop

      Gigabyte cooling fan, it's big but don't know the name and was cheap

      Several old hard drives, IDE and a 80 GB SATA 1 for the OS

      Windows 7 64-bit

      My PC runs everything flawlessly and all games I play on maximum settings at on a 32" HDTV with a Xbox 360 wireless controller.

      Total was $ around $600 if including RAM and other minor things. That is less than half of this new rig.

      Is there a need to build a new "budget" gaming PC if there is an option to get the performance from older hardware for much cheaper?

    • profile image

      Rupa 3 years ago

      Hi i have used a Biostar mobo in a similar configuration.Its good.

    • toptengamer profile image
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      Brandon Hart 3 years ago from The Game

      Noah, it would be really hard to know without having the exact build in front of me.

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      Noah H 3 years ago

      I want to buy a high(er) performance gaming desktop for around $1500 my dad works for a company that gets a discount from dell so i was considering buying an alienware Aurora R4 (the medium build) and the price came to around $1500 (35% off) would this be a smart move or could i buy a higher performance computer for the same price?

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      Author

      Brandon Hart 3 years ago from The Game

      Yes :). Through the board and the graphics card. It also has a DisplayPort option.

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      Scott P. 3 years ago

      this may sound like an idiotic question, because honestly, i'm not a computer expert. Does this build have a usable hdmi port?

    • toptengamer profile image
      Author

      Brandon Hart 3 years ago from The Game

      Nice job Matrixter - sounds like a beast.

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      matrixter 3 years ago

      Also, to anyone buying all the parts online like me. First off, look for as many promotion codes as you can find before you hit that checkout button. On newegg, I bought a combo which contained the CPU, (1) SSD, PSU, Motherboard and saved more than $50 just on that. Then I made sure when I put everything in the cart and was ready to checkout, that I clicked on each item to copy and paste their Promo codes for which ever ones had them. saved another $40-50 right there. Then finally, I shipped everything to instead of my house in NJ, to my friends house in PA where sales tax doesn't apply, so saved another $70 right there. So if you are stuck in a crappy state that has sales tax like CA or NJ try to see if you could do what I did and save some more money :)

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      matrixter 3 years ago

      I just put together my very first build. it's kind of similar to this.

      Fractal Design Define R4 (non-windowed, and then purchased the windowed panel just to have both)

      i7-4770k

      Corsiar Hyper 212 Evo

      Asus Sabertooth Z87 Tuf

      Gigabyte GTX 770 4gb

      Asus Xonar Essence STX

      16gb Corsair Vengeance 1600mhz RAM

      HX 850w PSU

      2 x 120gb Kingston SSDNOW V300 SSDs in RAID 0

      1 WD caviar black 7200rpm

      I put the SSDs behind the mobo and put the hdd in a MASSCOOL 5.25" drive bay cooler so that I could completely remove both Drive Cages to allow for much better airflow. If I need more disk space I'll use the other 5.25" bay for another. I bought a $12 lite-on dvd burner because it was on sale on newegg just incase I ever need it for something, haven't installed it.

      I played around a bit with overclocking this chip, I didn't fine tune or anything so I could have gotten much better but I was able to achieve a stable OC of 4.4 ghz using 1.21v and the highest temp for the hottest core was 93°C. I used Intel Burn Test for 20 runs on High setting. I feel that this is way too hot for my liking so I won't be OC'ing it at all until I get my water cooling solution. I am either waiting on the Cooler Master GLACER 240L to be available again or I am going to do a custom loop. I may even de-lid for better temps. But as for now, everything is running stock and I enabled the XMP profile.

      This computer is very fast. Windows 8.1 Pro operates with lightning speeds with those 2 SSDs in RAID. I'm loving it! Games perform really well, I got Assassin's Creed Black Flag, Batman Arkham Origins and Splinter Cell Blacklist all for free with the purchase of the GTX 770 on Amazon, Newegg has a similar offer but that's only when you also purchase a NVIDIA SHIELD with it, then you get the games. There is only a PNY GTX 770 on newegg that offers the games as a gift w.o having to buy the SHIELD. I bought it and then I found the Gigabyte version on Amazon so I am returning the PNY one. Gigabyte is a WAY better design, better stock OC clocks, better cooling, just better.

      Anyway, yea... I used to think that building a computer was going to be super hard. I surprised at how simple it is. I'm seeking the next challenge now, how I will water cool this beast :)

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      Gana 3 years ago

      I also suggest a Kingston Hyper X Blue DRAM which is very efficient and a Biostar Gaming motherboard which happens to be good.

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      Eric D. 4 years ago

      CPU - intel core i5 4670k $220

      CPU COOLING - Corsair Hydro Series H100i $100

      MOTHERBOARD - MSI Z87-G45 GAMING $160

      MEMORY - Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) $150

      GRAPHICS CARD - MSI GeForce GTX 760 $260

      COMP. CASE- CM Storm Scout 2 Advanced $95

      POWER SUPPLY - Corsair Gaming Series 700-Watt $110

      FANS - Corsair Air Series SP120 Quiet Edition Twin Pack Fan $28

      OPERATING SYS. - Windows 8 64 bit OEM $87

      HDD - Seagate Barracuda 2 TB HDD $95

      SSD - Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 120GB $100

      BluRay/DVD Drive - Pioneer Electronics BD/DVD/CD Burner $60

      Total - $1465 + tax (most items from amazon are free shipping) around $1600 total if you want to make it $1500 just take away the ssd. you don't particularly need it.

    • toptengamer profile image
      Author

      Brandon Hart 4 years ago from The Game

      For this build I've suggested 16GB of Corsair Vengeance memory.

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      Abed 4 years ago

      what about ram?