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How to Use the BIN2OCT Function in Excel for Mac

Joshua earned an MBA from USF and he writes mostly about software and technology.

The BIN2OCT function is being edited in the illustration with help tips appearing.

The BIN2OCT function is being edited in the illustration with help tips appearing.

The Purpose of the BIN2OCT Function

The BIN2OCT function allows an Excel user to convert a binary number into an octal number with a specified number of placeholders. The table shown below compares decimal versus binary in the first two columns. In addition, the binary column is also compared to octal number conversions for 1 to 4 placeholders.

Number Comparisons

The graph shows the decimal base 10 numbers compared to binary base 2 numbers and variations of octal base 8 numbers.

The graph shows the decimal base 10 numbers compared to binary base 2 numbers and variations of octal base 8 numbers.

The BIN2OCT Function Syntax

The BIN2OCT function of Excel needs to be inputted into a cell like a formula for it to work. To manually add this function the following steps need to be taken:

  1. A cell needs clicked type "=BIN2OCT(".
  2. After the open parenthesis, a binary number or cell reference to a binary number must be added followed by a comma. (use a closing parenthesis to skip the next step).
  3. Next, include the number of placeholders (optional) followed by a closing parenthesis.
  4. After the formula is created the formula can be entered.

Below in bold is the syntax of the BIN2OCT function shown in its entirety.

=BIN2OCT(Number, [Places])

  • Number - (Required) The number should be a binary number that needs to be converted to an octal number. If the number contains more than 10 bits (10 characters), an error will occur. The sign bit is the most significant of the numbers.
  • Places - (Optional) Signifies the number of characters to be used. If left empty the minimum character amount is used.

Example 1: Using Numbers

This first example shows the function being used with three binary numbers to be converted to octal numbers with three places.

how-to-use-the-function-in-excel-for-mac
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Example 2: Using Cell References

This second example shows cell references being used to convert the binary number. If the cells do not contain any values, the function will return a zero or multiple zeros depending on the number of places for which the function is set.

how-to-use-the-function-in-excel-for-mac

Inserting the BIN2OCT Function

The BIN2OCT function can be inserted into a cell with the use of a function insert tool. This can be done by selecting the cell, then clicking on the formulas tab. Next, click on the other functions button and the engineering option. Select BIN2OCT from the list of functions.

Select the Function

The BIN2OCT function is selected from a list of functions from a list of engineering functions.

The BIN2OCT function is selected from a list of functions from a list of engineering functions.

Once the formula builder appears, the arguments can be added to see what result will appear at the bottom of this feature. The formula builder can of great assistance to add to the understanding of how the function works. The argument definitions appear in the formula builder for reference as you are entering the formula.

After the arguments are added, the done button can be clicked for the function to be entered into the cell.

Enter Arguments in the Formula Builder

The formula builder for the BIN2OCT function guides you to use the function appropriately while also displaying what the function will return in the results section of this feature.

The formula builder for the BIN2OCT function guides you to use the function appropriately while also displaying what the function will return in the results section of this feature.

References

Microsoft. (n.d.). BIN2OCT function. Retrieved July 27, 2022, from https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/bin2oct-function-0a4e01ba-ac8d-4158-9b29-16c25c4c23fd

To learn more about using functions in Excel I recommend The Excel 2019 Bible book. I have been using the Excel Bible for years to improve my understanding of all aspects of this Microsoft product.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Joshua Crowder

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