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Typography Design: Basics

Typography Design: Basics

Typography is everywhere and has tremendous power to influence the message that a person wants to get across to his/her audience. With the use of a good typography and the help of all the other elements, you can express and present what’s the piece of information you want to pass on. It really establishes the overall tone and defines the design. It is more than just the looks of it. For example, if you want to spread a powerful message you need a bold, dynamic font that really goes with and highlights it. The font you use has a voice and a face. So, try to use it properly.

Font vs Typeface

First of all, let’s clear up the air regarding fonts and typefaces. I am fairly sure we’ve all been confused with what the difference between those two is. Well let’s see.

The main difference between them is that a typeface is a font family, it refers to the name of the particular type of design. For example, typeface is, Helvetica or Roboto or Open Sans etc. A font is a particular size, weight and style of a typeface. For example, font is, Helvetica Italic Bold 12 pt., Roboto 16 pt., Open Sans Light 10 pt. etc.

When designing the difference doesn’t really matter but it’s good to have the knowledge.

Common types of Typefaces

Let’s take a look at the most common types of typefaces and what we need to know in order to get the best use out of them.

San Serif

We see them being used very often in user interface and that’s because they hold their legibility at smaller sizes. It’s the best choice for a mobile phone use and for the buttons of websites. You can recognize them easily. They are the ones that go straight and don’t have any curves. The most well-known san serif that gets used the most is Roboto.

Here are some examples of San Serif typefaces (the typefaces in the photo are in the same size and style regular).

Here are some examples of San Serif typefaces (the typefaces in the photo are in the same size and style regular).

Serif

We usually use them when we want to throw attention to the text. They are the typefaces that at the end of the letters they have small lines and curves that tend to go to the left side. In other words, the ones that they look more calligraphic.

Here are some examples of Serif typefaces (the typefaces in the photo are in the same size and style regular).

Here are some examples of Serif typefaces (the typefaces in the photo are in the same size and style regular).

Display/Decorative

We frequently use them for a logo, or a headline, to a poster because their utility is when they are seen in a bigger size. With their usage you can establish a look and a name for your brand. You don’t really see them in a full text display because it tends to be really hard for the reader and very overwhelming.

Here are some examples of Display/Decorative typefaces (the typefaces in the photo are in the same size and style regular).

Here are some examples of Display/Decorative typefaces (the typefaces in the photo are in the same size and style regular).

Tips for the best usage

  • never use more than three typefaces
  • pair serif fonts with san serif ones. Such as putting your title in san serif and your main text in serif (or vice-versa) for a good contrast. Avoid using similar fonts. Sometimes you can’t tell the difference between them and the look of it seems boring
  • when combing fonts that are in the same typeface family, use a different size or style to make the text more interesting, unique and different

By understanding typography, you can express your work through it, in endless ways. It’s a guide for making a beautiful work in the most possible right way. Experiment with them and develop the best style that represent you and your work.

© 2021 Elisavet Vasilakou

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