nVidia GTX 980 Ti 2017 Review and Gaming Benchmarks

Updated on December 18, 2017
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I'm just a small time guy working a normal job as a physician assistant. My passion is building PCs and testing/reviewing PC hardware.

nVidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti Graphics Card

In early 2015, nVidia released its GTX 980 Ti to improve on its already stellar GTX 980 graphics card as a preemptive answer to AMD’s new generation of powerful Radeon graphics cards that would be the first cards featuring the high-bandwidth memory (HBM), which was the successor to GDDR5 memory.

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The nVidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti would do away with the vanilla GTX 980’s GM204 graphics processor unit (GPU) and instead would feature a cut-down version of the Titan X’s better GM200 chip. The GTX 980 Ti features 2816 CUDA cores and a base clock running at 1000MHz, a boost clock of 1075MHz, and a memory clock of 3505MHz. The GTX 980 Ti comes with 6GB of GDDR5 video memory and draws 250 watts of TDP through one 8-pin and one 6-pin power connector. The card offers 3 DisplayPorts, 1 HDMI port, and 1 Dual-Link DVI port. The GTX 980 Ti has a thermal threshold of 92 degrees Celsius.

*See full specifications below*

nVidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti Specifications

For the testing on this card, I placed the GTX 980 Ti in my Intel Core i7-7700K gaming rig. The Core i7-7700K is overclocked to 4.7GHz and is installed into the MSI Z270 Tomahawk motherboard with 16GB of Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 RAM clocked at 2666MHz. Cooling of the CPU is achieved with the Corsair H60 liquid all-in-one CPU cooler and the system is powered by the EVGA 550 watt 80 plus Bronze Certified modular power supply. I did not stick with base clocks on this card either. I was able to achieve a 1.25GHz core clock which boosted to 1.48Ghz and I was able to get 2GHz on the memory which equated to approximately 8GB per second transfer rate.

I tested 5 games at 1080p and on the highest settings of each of the games. The 5 games tested were some of the newest games here in late 2017 which is comprised of Battlefront 2, Assassin’s Creed: Origins, Destiny 2, Total War: Warhammer II, and Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus. So, without any further delay, let’s get to the benchmarks.

Up first is the newly released Battlefront 2. This game has incredible visuals and is quite stunning which would lead us to believe that it is extremely demanding, and it is but it is extremely well optimized which allows for the GTX 980 Ti run at an average of 98 FPS and a 1% low of 86 FPS.

Battlefront II
 
Average FPS
98
1% Low
86
 
 

Next, Assassin’s Creed: Origins was tested and it is a night and day difference from Battlefront 2 as it is not optimized well at all and it is pretty evident in testing. There was stutter from time to time but the GTX 980 Ti did hold it’s own, for the most part. I was able to get an average of 71 FPS and a 1% low of 59 FPS on the GTX 980 Ti.

Assassin's Creed: Origins
 
Average FPS
71
1% Low FPS
59
 
 

Next up was Destiny 2 which is a game I am playing almost exclusively as I’m a pretty big fan of the game, regardless of the limited things to do in game. The issue of nothing to do in the game aside, the game is stunning visually and with the new updated drivers from nVidia, man, it looks amazing and runs really well, even on this older card. I was able to get 108 FPS on average and a 1% low of 95 FPS on the GTX 980 Ti.

Destiny 2
 
Average FPS
108
1% Low FPS
95
 
 

Total War: Warhammer II was up next. This is a really demanding game as can be evidenced by the 56 average FPS and 1% low of 47 FPS. The game ran fairly smooth with limited stutter on occasion.

Total War: Warhammer II
 
 
Average FPS
56
 
1% Low FPS
47
 
 
 
 

Finally, Wolfenstin II: The New Colossus was up. This is a game based on the Vulkan platform and is preferred by AMD hardware which could explain the numbers given this game is not that demanding but still quite beautiful, visually. The GTX 980 Ti was able to get 121 average FPS and a 1% low of 107 FPS.

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
 
 
Average FPS
121
 
1% Low FPS
107
 
 
 
 

Conclusion and Final Thoughts

So, there you have it. Is this card capable in today’s games? Yes, it absolutely is. The GTX 980 Ti is still clearly a very capable graphics card. As a matter of fact, this is probably why those who purchased the card back in 2015 hasn’t upgraded to a GTX 1070, GTX 1070 Ti, or GTX 1080. The GTX 980 Ti is aging very well and if you are willing to lower some settings, you will be gaming on par with the GTX 1070 and GTX 1070 Ti. Would I buy this card today? No and there is a reason for that. For the same price in which you can purchase this card, you can get a GTX 1070 Ti or GTX 1080 which you can squeeze more performance out of for the same price. However, If you can find this card used for around $200-$275, it would be worth taking a long look at and actually purchase. At the same point, if you already own this card, unless you are wanting to get into 4K gaming, which would mean you are probably looking at getting a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, you would be fine sticking with the 2015 GeForce GTX 980 Ti as it is still viable in today's triple A gaming scene.

Linus Tech Tips Review of nVidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti

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