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How Much Is Your Old Vintage Apple Mac Computer Worth?

Updated on July 29, 2017
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Jason Ponic works in the exciting world of Hollywood film and television by day and writes by night.

Are you sitting on a Jackpot?

Since the passing of Apple's founder, Steve Jobs, in 2011, vintage Macintosh computers are finally seeing a resurgence in popularity. For those of you who decided to keep your old Macs, this is good news for you! Now these charming old machines are fetching a decent penny on eBay and Craigslist.

Below, we'll compare the 1980s sticker price with what it's currently going for. Take advantage of this opportunity before the bubble pops for good!

Apple I

The original Apple Computer, the Apple I, is considered one of the most valuable and collectable computers in the world. Only 575 units were ever sold, making it the rarest one around. Today, there are only 61 confirmed to exist, only six of which are functional.

In 2013, an Apple 1 sold at Christie's Auction for $390,000. Several have also appeared on eBay over the years, where the highest successful bid was $43,000.

Apple 1 Replica

These often surface on eBay. These are either the 'Replica 1' from Briel Computer or the Newton NTI clone. The value for an unassembled replica hovers around $1,000 for the kit.

Regarding Apple/Macintosh 'Clones'

During the brief and unsuccessful Apple cloning years, a number of machines emerged using licensed hardware and software. Most were inferior in both performance and quality. Today, their value is difficult to ascertain, as no two clones were truly identical. Many are considered undesirable and sell for just a few hundred dollars, if that.

One of the first successful home computer systems, the Apple II sold from 1977 to 1993. It was their first mass produced personal computer and was released in a number of models, each improving on its predecessor. In total, six million were sold, many going to schools and companies, making it the very first computer available for use in public schools.

Apple II Series

A2S1 Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $2,500
Working Condition: Up to $1,000
Broken: Up to $200
Monitor Value: $150
Components: Up to $500

Apple II Plus A2S1048 Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $250
Working Condition: Up to $150
Broken: Up to $100
Monitor Value: $125

Apple IIe Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $400
Working Condition: $35-$300
Broken: Up to $100
Components: $100-$1000

Apple IIc Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $1,000
Working Condition: Up to $460
Broken: Up to $100
Components: $100-$500

Apple IIGS Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $700
Working Condition: Up to $500
Broken: Up to $100
Components: $100-$1,000

Less than 100,000 Apple IIIs were ever sold.
Less than 100,000 Apple IIIs were ever sold.
Source

Apple III

Released in 1980, the Apple III attempted to improve on the highly successful Apple II, instead it was a flop. When it was first released, it was very unstable, couldn't function and ultimately had to be recalled and released as the Apple III Revised. Aimed as a business computer, the Apple III came with a then industry standard typewriter keyboard layout. While a stable version was eventually released, the Apple III Plus, its already tainted reputation and the release of IBM's DOS PC ultimately killed the Apple III.

Complete System (Original/Revised)
Mint Condition: Up to $1,000
Working Condition: Up to $650
Broken: Up to $200

Complete System (Plus)
Mint Condition: Up to $650
Working Condition: Up to $150
Broken: Up to $100

Apple Lisa / Macintosh XL

Named after Steve Jobs' daughter, Lisa, this was one of the final models released before the introduction of Macintosh in 1984. Aimed at corporations, the computer's hefty price tag of $10,000 in 1984 was considered too great a risk to take and sales were poor. In 1986, the Lisa was renamed the Macintosh XL and fitted with an emulator to run Mac OS.

Complete System (Lisa)
Mint Condition: Up to $3,800
Working Condition: Up to $2,500
Broken: Up to $700

Complete System (Macintosh XL)
Mint Condition: Up to $1,000
Working Condition: Up to $700
Broken: Up to $300

Part Out Value
Components: $325 - $500
Manuals & Documents: Up to $375
Most Valuable Part: Internal Hard Drive

Internal Hard Drive Value: Up to $100

The upgraded Lisa is rarer and worth approximately 20% more.

Mac 128 K All-in-One Computer

Released in January 1984 as the very first Macintosh, the 128k was the first personal computer to feature a Graphic User Interface, a basic feature that would define home computing for decades to come. The 128k was also the first to feature a 3.5" floppy disk drive. Adding to its collector's value is the travel case that came with every 128k. Complete, non-upgraded systems, with original packaging, manuals, software disks, and travel case, will easily fetch $2,000+ on eBay.

M0001 Complete Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $2,700
Working Condition: Up to $650
Broken: $20 -$35

Part Out Value
Parts and Components: $100 - 300
Most Valuable Component: Internal Floppy Drive*

* The grease originally used to lubricate the internal floppy drive may solidify after 30 years of non-use, rendering the drive useless. Soaking the drive in an acetone bath overnight will restore the drive to working order!

A 128k in its travel case. The case will easily add several hundred dollars to your system's value.
A 128k in its travel case. The case will easily add several hundred dollars to your system's value.

Macintosh 512k All-in-One Computer

Identical to the 128k with the exception of its expanded memory, the 512k 'Fat Mac' was discontinued in 1986 when it was replaced by the 512ke.

Today, a functioning external floppy drive is highly collectable with an average selling price of $200.

512k Complete Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $900
Working Condition: Average $200
Broken: $25
Parts and Accessories: $150

512ke Complete Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $200
Working Condition: $99
Broken: $5
Parts and Accessories: $150

The Mac Plus.
The Mac Plus.

Macintosh Plus

Apple's first expandable Macintosh, the Plus introduced the SCSI port to allow for a multitude of external additions. It was sold to academia as the Mac ED.

Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $800
Working Condition: Up to $500
Broken: Up to $100

Apple Macintosh SE/30

Complete Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $875.00
Average Selling:
$250.00
Broken Selling:
$10 - $75.00

Part Out Value
Parts and Components:
$200 - $250
Most Valuable Component:
Ethernet Network Card upgrade

Ethernet Network Card Information
Model:
Asante Ethernet 10 Base T*
Average Selling Price:
$35

*The card was a third party upgrade package sold between 1990 and 1992. It will still allow an SE/30 to communicate with most modern networks.

Macintosh Classic II

Built to replace the SE/30, the Classic II was the last of the Black & White Compact Macs. Whopping fast at 16 MHz with an 80 Mb hard drive and 10 Mb of RAM. It was also the last model to include an external drive port.

Apple officially discontinued support for the Classic II in 2001, ten years after its introduction.

Complete Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $350
Average Selling:
Up to $150
Broken Selling:
$40

The Portable's unwanted nickname was 'The Luggable' due to its 16 lb weight and less than one hour of battery life.
The Portable's unwanted nickname was 'The Luggable' due to its 16 lb weight and less than one hour of battery life.

Macintosh Portable

Apple's very first battery powered computer, the portable was a total failure when it was released in 1989. It was heavy, slow, expensive, and had no expansion capabilities. While voted one of the worst tech gadgets of all time, the Portable holds the title as the first computer to ever send an email from space.

Its overall collector's value lies in its batteries. The original lead-based batteries are no longer made, and like a car battery, permanently fail if depleted completely due to inactivity or neglect. Units that still function today often have rebuilt batteries or have been modified to use lithium-ion batteries of the same voltage.

Complete System (w/ Rebuilt Batteries):
Mint Condition: Up to $1,000
Working Condition: Up to $700
Broken: $40-$100

Part Out Value: $500

The Powerbook 100
The Powerbook 100

Apple Powerbook 100

Apple's bottom-rung inaugural powerbook released in 1991 that would become the foundation of all Macbooks over the next twenty years. This particular model lacked CPU, RAM, and expansions that its two running mates had including a floppy drive. It has since been named the 10th greatest personal computer of all time.

Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $500
Working Condition: Up to $150
Broken: $10-$50

Apple JLPGA PowerBook 170

A multi-colored edition Powerbook 170, the JLPGA was built as a commemorative for the 1992 JLPGA Golf Tournament in Japan. Underneath the flashy facade were the workings of a basic Powerbook 170. It was never intended to be a powerful machine but what makes it valuable is that only 500 were ever produced.

Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $9,000
Working Condition: Up to $7,000
Broken: Up to $1,000

To date, the JLPGA is the only PowerBook 170 worth some serious coin. The typical value of a standard dark grey model is less than $250.

Macintosh Color Classic

Apple's first color compact Macintosh, the Color Classic ultimately set the stage for the iMac. Essentially a Performa platform computer inside a retro Mac body, even today the Classic has a cult following not seen since the original Macintosh. Some Color Classics have been modified to include an ethernet card that can still connect to broadband networks.

Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $600
Working Condition: Up to $300
Broken: Up to $100
Components: Up to $500

20th Anniversary Macintosh

Intended as a collector's edition computer to celebrate Apple's 20th anniversary, this system sold for $10,000 new.

Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $1,000
Working Condition: Up to $650
Broken: $100-$140

Part Out Value: $500

20th Anniversary Commercial

Macintosh TV

Released as a limited edition in 1993, the Macintosh TV was one of the few desktops ever released in black and Apple's first attempt at computer-television integration. Equipped with a cable TV ready tuner card and a television monitor, the TV could switch from a computer to a television set in a matter of seconds and even came with a remote control. Yet it was incapable of recording live video, only still frames. Its poor processor speed and other limitations made the unit a failure and ultimately only 10,000 were sold.

Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $500
Working Condition: Up to $350
Broken: Up to $100

Part Out Value: $150 - $300

Most Valuable Component: TV Tuner Card

Macintosh Quadra 840av

Released in 1993, the 840av stood apart from the rest of the 800 series because it included RCA composite video/audio ports and an S-Video port. The 840av was also the first to come with an internal CD Drive, stereo output, and video recording capabilities.

Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $1,100
Working Condition: Up to $310
Broken: Up to $100

Part Out Value: $150 - $500

Macintosh Quadra 900 and 950 Series

One of many early 90s era computers prior to Steve Jobs' return to the company in 1997. Values include 900 and 950 models.

Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $350
Working Condition: Up to $250
Broken: Up to $100

Part Out Value: $150 - $500

Macintosh G4 Cube

Before the Mac Mini, there was the G4 Cube, Apple's first attempt to build a small profile desktop computer. Unfortunately, it was a flop. Its limited capabilities and uncomfortably high price tag forced the Cube into the grave after just one year. The model was unofficially replaced by the Mac Mini. Despite its failure, the Cube did gain a cult following similar to that of 80s Macs.

Complete System
Mint Condition: Up to $600
Working Condition: $200-$350
Broken: Up to $100

Apple's very first digital camera was capable of taking photos at SD resolution of 640x480 pixels.
Apple's very first digital camera was capable of taking photos at SD resolution of 640x480 pixels.

Apple QuickTake Digital Camera

Developed in 1994, the QuickTake series was one of the very first product lines of digital cameras. Considered a marketing failure at the time, its rarity makes this device highly prized by collectors.

Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $200
Working Condition: Up to $100
Broken: Up to $20


Apple PowerBook G3 Series

Made famous by Sex and the City, the black G3 series laptops were the fastest available when they were launched in 1997. The were the first of Apple's laptops to feature the G3 processor.

Complete System (Kanga)
Mint Condition: Up to $150
Working Condition: $100
Broken: Less than $10

Complete System (Wallstreet I & II)
Mint Condition: Up to $175
Working Condition: $120
Broken: Less than $20

Complete System (Bronze Keyboard)
Mint Condition: Up to $100
Working Condition: $75
Broken: Less than $20

Complete System (Pismo)
Mint Condition: Up to $200
Working Condition: $150
Broken: $50

Apple Newton MessagePad

Being twenty years ahead of its time made the Newton a flop at its initial release. It was capable of nearly everything the iPad would later do, including word processing, phone calls, internet browsing, games, and more. The most valuable variant was a special clear case edition.

Original MessagePad Complete System:
Mint Condition: Up to $1,400
Working Condition: Up to $350
Broken: Up to $100

MessagePad 100 Complete System:
Mint Condition:
Up to $560
Working Condition:
Up to $350
Broken:
Up to $100

*The price of Newton MessagePads tend to roller coaster on eBay. As of 2015, values are considerably less than they were in 2011.

Apple iPhone 2G — 1st Generation

In 2007, Apple released the original iPhone and changed the way we looked at cell phones. The 1st generation iPhone, now obsolete, can fetch a staggering amount on eBay, depending on condition. Factory sealed units with original gift bags and receipts can sell for tens of thousands of dollars.

4GB Unit:
Early Serial No: Up to $15,000
Mint Condition: Up to $9,500
Working Condition: Up to $600
Broken: $45 - $150

8GB Unit:
Mint Condition: Up to $9,500
Working Condition: Up to $600
Broken: $25 - $150

Valuable or Worthless?

Remember, not every Macintosh is jackpot. Many unremarkable models exist today worth just a few hundred dollars or less, for a multitude of reasons:

  1. The model was neither revolutionary in concept or function or just simply a filler model to build out the Apple product line. These were particularly common in the years leading up to Steve Jobs' return in 1997.
  2. The model was so mass produced that more than 60% of all units still exist today.
  3. Servers or other industrial configured models stripped it of all consumer functionality.
  4. Not enough time has passed for it to be considered a worthwhile collector's item. With the exception of the iPhone 1 and a few others, most collectable machines are 30 years or older.

Systems Worth $150 or Less

The following systems are currently worth $150 or less, regardless of condition, in the current eBay market:

  • Centris 650
  • iMac G3 Biege or Color
  • iMac Dome & Swivel
  • Imaginewriter Printer
  • Imaginewriter II Printer
  • LCIII
  • Macintosh 512Ke
  • Macintosh IISi
  • Macintosh Performa 600
  • Macintosh Performa 636
  • Macintosh Performa LC 520
  • Newton eMate 300
  • Power Macintosh 9600/200
  • Power Macintosh 7500/100
  • Quadra 605
  • Quadra LC 630
  • Quadra 700

Apple iPad – 1st Generation

2010, yet another milestone year for Apple with the release of the iPad. Against all predictions of certain failure, the iPad's success ushered in the beginning of the tablet era of computing. The 1st generation iPad established screen sizing and control placement that would make up every generation since. Factory sealed units with early serials numbers can fetch a decent amount if the timing is right.

16 GB Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $1,350
Working Condition: $150 - $710
Broken: $45 - $200

32 GB Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $700
Working Condition: $75 - $325
Broken: $5 - $50

64 GB Unit
Mint Condition: Up to $600
Working Condition: Up to $300
Broken: $2 - $40


What You Need to Know Before You Sell

Not every vintage computer is a jackpot. Some models happen to sell better than others. A Mac 128k, for example, can fetch well over $2,000 on eBay while its newer cousin the 512k will fetch only $500. Sentimental value is not the same as resale value. Dozens of listings go unsold because of a ridiculous price of say $10,000 for an old, unremarkable machine that has no accessories or desirables.

There are several factors to take into account when listing your vintage Mac:

  • First is condition: Does it work? Naturally, a working computer will sell for more than a broken one.
  • Secondly, what you include with it will also help determine its value. A listing that includes a keyboard, mouse, original install disks, and software will attract a better price than a listing for a computer body by itself.
  • There is absolutely no guarantee you will hit a high selling bid. Like all auctions, it is risky and can be as big of a disappointment as it could be a jackpot. Sellers beware!

Part Out vs. Complete System
Some computer models are actually worth more in parts. A Mac SE/30 may only fetch $100 as a complete unit but could fetch nearly $400 in parts. Certain parts are highly prized (like the internal floppy drive, the ram, etc.).

Upgrade kits are very valuable today. Different economics applied to computers in those days. The thought of buying a new computer every two years was unheard of, so the idea was that you bought it, made repairs as needed, and kept it until it completely wore out. Macs were originally designed to be upgraded rather than replaced. By the late 80s, it became apparent that hardware limitations impeded upgrades and by the early 90s, Apple abolished upgrading altogether.

Research what your computer has and it will help determine whether it is worth more as a complete unit or as a parts box. The prices contained on this page are based on successful eBay listings, not unsold listings. In other words, anyone can ask for $10,000 for a Mac Plus, but nobody's going to pay that much for it.

How to Format Your Listing

The type of auction you choose greatly improves or reduces your chances for a successful sale. When setting up your listing, use the following:

  1. Auction Style listings for vintage computers have a 95% success rate. A Buy-It-Now, even with a low price, will actually hurt your chances of maximizing profit.
  2. 3 Day Auction: A quick sale is a good sale. Bidding stops after three days.
  3. Bullet Lists keep it short, sweet, and simple. Vintage computers sell really well on eBay Mobile. Write your listing keeping that tiny cell phone screen in mind. Avoid writing paragraphs of information, as a long listing will actually deter an impulse buyer.
  4. Pictures, Pictures, Pictures! The more pictures you have, the greater your chances of a sale!

Comments

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    • profile image

      SD 8 days ago

      Hi, I'm trying to find out how much a black Macintosh power PC 275 is worth. Can any one help or point me in the right direction for advice. All in working order with box

    • profile image

      Tim 6 weeks ago

      Did you know that if you open the 1st edition Macintosh (1984), All of the original designers have their signatures on the inside of the cover including Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

    • profile image

      Bernd 7 weeks ago

      Thanks, Jason! I enjoyed reading the article and appreciate the quick answer.

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 7 weeks ago from Albuquerque

      The Powerbook 140 is only fetching at best $150 on eBay currently regardless of condition.

    • profile image

      Joyce 8 weeks ago

      I have an old Tel it series 5000. Do you know how much it is worth?

    • profile image

      nora 8 weeks ago

      hi, i am cleaning house and shipping somethings back to the US from France where I was living. I have an old iBook, still works, date on back is 1999. Mac OS 9.0.4

      built in memory 160MB, unused 127.8. it says in about part 36.5MB

      I don't know if I should ship it back to San Francisco, or throw it away. Its so pretty, blue clam shell I think. I hate to do that. seems to work ok. I know nothing about computers, does it have any value? shall I keep it a few more years? Thank. you, nora

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 2 months ago from Albuquerque

      You need the actual model number, A11276 is just a serial number.

    • profile image

      Schreckles 2 months ago

      Hi! I have a 17" MacBook Pro (Mosel No: A1297). Great condition. Works great! Still have the box. Just read that it will be discontinued and going into the Apple Vintage files this year. If it goes into the vintage category, how much do you think it would be worth?

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 2 months ago from Albuquerque

      ebay

    • profile image

      Craigsolo 3 months ago

      Where did you get your figures on the Apple 1--in particular 575 sold? According to Jobs, he told me that there were only 200 built of which 175 were actually sold. Jobs gave the others away to some of the early Apple employees. Woz verified these figures also. I think the most paid for one so far was about $910,000 by the Henry Ford Museum. I have owned 3 Apple 1 computers myself of which 2 of them were still functional. One of those sold at Breker's in Germany a few years ago for $645,000 and another is now in a museum in Turin, Italy.

    • profile image

      TC Thompson 3 months ago

      I have a working 1986 Apple Macintosh Plus Computer with Apple Image Writer ll Printer, Keyboard, Mouse & External Drive.  I am the original Owner. Excellent condition. Exact production date: October 11, 1986.

      Original packaging (box has is faded/worn/discoloring, styrofoam packing is perfect.  Includes original power chords, interfact chords, 2 System Tools Discs, Hypercard floppy discs. Original box for manuals (1 flawless, 1 extra used/faded), literature, Guided Tour cassette tape(never played), plastic yellow shipping discs. Any thoughts here?

    • profile image

      Applegirl 3 months ago

      Hello,

      I have Mac Performa 600 unopened and sealed in box. How much is it worth? Thank you for your help!!!

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 5 months ago from Albuquerque

      This article is for information about vintage computers only. Your computer needs to have been manufactured before 2000 in order to place a value on it.

    • profile image

      Rob Hulbert 5 months ago

      In 1982, I purchased a 128K Mac with 20Mb Internal Drive with extra 3.5 inch drive and an Imagewriter printer. I could have downloaded a 12Mb? song, only. My current iMac with 1 Terabyte internal drive can download 129,720 songs, some Classical ones @ 44Mb. I sold it to a friend for $2,000 Aussie dollars because I had paid $5,200 for it in mid-1982. What's it's value, working.

    • profile image

      Carl Alda 5 months ago

      I am looking to sell all my old Apple computers with peripherals.

      Here is a list:

      Macintosh Plus

      G5 tower

      G4

      G3 tower scsi

      Apple CD drive scsi

      Apple floppy external drive

      Apple printer model A9M0303

      Powermac 7200/90 scsi

      Powermac 7200/90

      Powermac 7200/90 display

      Nikon Coolscan 100 for mac scsi

      Nikon Coolscan 100 for mac scsi

      G4 computer original Box

      G5 computer original Box

      Apple 520 laptop corrugated box

      Zip Drive original box

      A ton of software including:

      Quark Express

      Illustrator 5

      Illustrator 4

      Photoshp5

      Photoshop 4

      Acrobat 5

      OS 8

      OS 7.51 individual floppies

      Kodak Arrange It

      Kodak Create It

      Orange Converter

      Adobe Type Manager DeLux

      Photoshop4

      Let me know if you are interested.

    • profile image

      Sean Cushman 6 months ago

      Hi Jason thanks for this great article.

      I have a Color Classic running OS 8.6 that has a motheroard with a powerPC 603.

      I was wondering if this would add to the value or lower it.

      I think it my be out of a Power Mac 5200, not positive though.

      Also, my mouse does not work. do you know how I can get to System Information with the keyboard?

      Thanks Sean

    • profile image

      Sean Cushman 6 months ago

      Hi Jason thanks for this great article

      I have a Color Classic that has a motherboard with a power PC 603 in it, maybe from a power Mac 5200. I was wondering if that would increase the value and what you think I should ask for it. Also I don't have a working mouse for it, is there anyway to open system information with the keyboard?

      Thanks

      Sean

    • profile image

      ivan 7 months ago

      I really don't know what kind of imac it is but I am pretty sure its a imac G3. How much do you think it's worth? It works and it has the og keyboard.

    • profile image

      GS 7 months ago

      Oh, and I have an Apple Lisa non-upgraded with the original manual and one floppy disk. How much is that worth? Thanks

      I really like your guide, it's the one-stop place for all my apple computer values as I have many.

    • profile image

      GS 7 months ago

      I have a Macintosh SE FDHD w/ original box, manual, etc that actually works. How much would it be worth?

    • profile image

      Bette 7 months ago

      I have an IMAC Flower Power computer. Is it worth anything?

    • profile image

      K marz 8 months ago

      I am looking to sell Perfect Condition Macintosh IIVX 8/230 w/512k, Extended Keyboard, Personal Laserwriter NTR and 21" Precision Color Display. All purchased 8/93. Used 10 times. Stored since.

    • profile image

      Kay B 8 months ago

      I have a MacPlus, keyboard, mouse, external HD w/floppies. ReadySetGo. Bought new, still runs, what is it worth?

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 8 months ago from Albuquerque

      The value of the SE is already in this article.

    • profile image

      AP 9 months ago

      Sorry, it was Mac SE, no such thing as Mac SE20!

    • profile image

      AP 9 months ago

      Hi Jason, I have a working, near mint condition Mac SE20 (I believe it is SE20, purchased in a college book store in 1988ish) in the original box (very clean and great condition but some clear packing tapes on and address written on 1 or 2 sides) with an unopened and an opened sets of manuals (happen to have 2 sets of same manuals) in mint conditions, plus a mouse cover shaped like a mouse which was sold in Apple 'Company Store' in 1988 (no tag). Could you give me quotes for these?

    • profile image

      koug01 10 months ago

      I have a NeXt computer system to sell and a few newtons ( a clear and black). Any idea how much this stuff is worth? Monitors, cube, printer, manuals

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 10 months ago from Albuquerque

      The value of the Apple II system is in this article.

    • profile image

      Rob 10 months ago

      I have a working Performa and a G4 (quicksilver) plus 80's mac software...what do you think they're worth? And does anyone know who buys old software like this? Thnaks

    • profile image

      Rosa Ruiz 10 months ago

      I found in my attic an Apple II A2S1048 - CPU only- probably 28 years old. I don't know if it works. Is it worth anything? Thanks

    • profile image

      ruby 11 months ago

      but where or who would i sell it to?

    • profile image

      miguel 12 months ago

      hi !

      i have a complete LCIII system, including keyboard, mouse, monitor, stylewriter II printer and installation diskettes for the system and microsoft word, all working fine and in great condition. also all of the user manuals.

      you haven't mentioned the LCIII, is this an interesting model for collectors?

      should i sell it? for how much?

    • profile image

      Len 12 months ago

      How much is a PowerBook 270c worth?

      Do you see iBook g4s becoming collectible or not.?

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 12 months ago from Albuquerque

      Unfortunately the LaserWriter isn't worth anything. It can fetch $100 on a good day, regardless of condition.

    • profile image

      Bill 12 months ago

      My father has a complete system, Macintosh 1mb with external floppy (I believe, but will check) and a LaserWriter printer. I haven't seen any posts that mention the LaserWriter. Is the LaserWriter of any value? Is the system worth anything?

    • profile image

      Claude et Denise 12 months ago

      I have a Apple Multiple Scan 17'' Display Family ID: AK8M2494, Manufactured July 1995 (S15300Y91XX) and aPower Macintosh 7500/100.

      How much should I ask?

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 12 months ago from Albuquerque

      All iMacs are worth $200 or less.

    • profile image

      Lane 12 months ago

      What will a iMac bond I blue 1998 G3 233mhz sell for?

      Also what would a summer 2001 indigo iMac G3 500mhz sell for

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 12 months ago from Albuquerque

      @Davaoda If its still in the box, never opened, it would be considered mint condition. With the right timing it could probably fetch $1,000 or more.

    • profile image

      Davaoda 12 months ago

      I have an Apple IIc that is in the original box and never opened. The box has been in the original shipping box and is mint. Any idea of a value ? Thanks.

    • jasonponic profile image
      Author

      Jason Ponic 12 months ago from Albuquerque

      In mint condition, the Wallstreet aka the Sex in the City Laptop runs about $200

    • profile image

      Flygirl 13 months ago

      I have a black Wallstreet laptop from 1998, with the optional Zip drive removable drive. Worth anything? Operates, but battery isn't much good anymore.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 13 months ago from Albuquerque

      The Apple Quadra series isn't worth much, fetching an average selling price on eBay for $50.00 for a complete system.

    • profile image

      DB 13 months ago

      I've got a fully functioning Quadra 605 with Apple Full Color 14" Display, Working Apple Keyboard and Mouse. I've also got all start up disks, user guides, and extra cords. How much can I expect?

      Thanks!!!

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 13 months ago from Albuquerque

      The Apple II A2S1048 is the Apple II Plus which fetches an average sale price of $250 on eBay.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 13 months ago from Albuquerque

      The Apple Modem seems to fetch between $30-$100

    • profile image

      John 13 months ago

      I have an original Apple Modem 300 in box in pristine condition. Is it worth anything?

    • profile image

      Mopusgroup 14 months ago

      I have an Apple II A2S1048; Serial # A2S2-265321 my mother received as an Apple employee in the late 70's. I also have monitor, two floppy drives, all the start up disks, VisiCalc and a lot of other software an manuals included employee training. Also have original Centronics Model 737-1 dot matrix printer. All products work fine. What is this worth on eBay?

    • profile image

      Denise 15 months ago

      I have a Apple Multiple Scan 17'' Display Family ID: AK8M2494, Manufactured July 1995 (S15300Y91XX) and aPower Macintosh 7500/100.

      How much should I ask?

    • profile image

      Thomasj106 16 months ago

      I have a vintage distressed leather messenger bag with the word logo "Apple" embroided into the flap. This bag is cool. Really cool. It is in excellent condition and would be in mint condition had one of the pockets inside not have it's stitching pull loose.

      I worked for Apple as a Genius in a Florida store and when I brought this bag in to show everyone people were throwing out all kinds of $$$ they were willing pay to buy it from me. I thought the bag was too cool to sell. Heck, for all I know this could have been Steve Jobs own personal laptop bag!

      I would love to be able to find another one like it or at very least, find out what the value of this one is. Anybody have any ideas?

    • profile image

      Tami 16 months ago

      What a wonderful resource! Thank you so much for this webpage. I have read all of the comments and previously you gave prices on Apple IIe's. I have 8 of them. What I really need info on are values for the Color Monitor and the Imagewriter Printer. I have 2 or 3 of each of these. Also I have so many disks and manuals. Of these, which would be valuable? Thank you again : )

    • profile image

      Denise 16 months ago

      I have a Apple Multiple Scan 17'' Display Family ID: AK8M2494, Manufactured July 1995 (S15300Y91XX) and aPower Macintosh 7500/100.

      How much should I ask?

    • profile image

      Brent Hubbard 16 months ago

      I have the dome and swivel iMac. I've upgraded the ram as far as I can, but it just runs too slow. Is there anyone who can renovate it or bring it up to modern speed, maybe replace the processor or the whole internals?

    • profile image

      Wjw 16 months ago

      I have a working Quadra 700 with the PowerPC nubus upgrade card, keyboard and mouse.

      Any idea on value?

    • profile image

      Aqlim Barlas 17 months ago

      I have Mac LC 520 manufactured in 1993 but don't have the keyboard .What price can I expec

    • profile image

      Christina Coughlan 17 months ago

      Any ideas on value of PowerBook 100. Just gave one away to be recycled but can still track it down.

    • Rechargians profile image

      Shafi Khan 19 months ago from India

      Interesting article, Enjoyed reading it.

    • profile image

      Bushok 19 months ago

      Hi Jason, I would to like your price tags on these 3 Apple's I've got (all Euro specs):

      1. Apple Macintosh 128K upgraded to 512K (just the chipset, drive is 400K) with original box incl. keyboard and mouse and original keyboard box, power cable box and plastic software box. Boxes are not in pristine condition but fine (and rare I thought);

      2. Apple IIGS with monitor, keyboard, mouse and cd drive with absolute pristine boxes of computer, monitor and cd drive with manuals and floppy disks. All original, used, but in a super state;

      3. Apple Macintosh II, with keyboard and mouse, original box (shows signs of its oldness) and absolute pristine (they are like new!) boxes of Apple Extended Keyboard, Apple Macintosh II Video Card, Apple Macintosh II Card Expansion Kit.

      I do have more vintage Apple gear, also with original boxes, incredible stuff. But I'de appreciate your valued opinion on the computers named above.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 19 months ago from Albuquerque

      The upgrade damages the value. Upgraded M0001s have an average selling price of $350-600.00.

      Now the upgrade package by itself, especially if unopened and in its original packaging, is worth serious money

    • profile image

      Nooby Doo 19 months ago

      How much does the 512k upgrade affect the price of the Macintosh M0001?

    • Hanzamfafa profile image

      Mike Leal 19 months ago from London

      This is a very interesting article. I had a great time reading it. great information.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 19 months ago from Albuquerque

      Apple IIe's average value is $35-$300 on eBay these days.

      Newton eMate runs about $50.00

    • profile image

      Michael 19 months ago

      I have a Apple IIe with mointor and 2 floppy drives and printer. All work how much you think this is work.

      Also have in box Newton eMate 300 works with power cord and pen.

      mahalo

    • profile image

      Sam Loh 20 months ago

      Hi,

      I have a mountain full of Apples and accessories.

      Looking for someone who can do a join write-up for " Crowd funding an Apples recycle museum using Apple parts to build replica 0f - coliseum, golden gate bridge, stadium".

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 21 months ago from Northeast Ohio

      As a long time Apple user, this was valuable information to know. I've ditched my old computers in the past with way past expired warranties. I could've gotten some money from my old Imac and and Ibook computers. Maybe next time, if there is one... Thanks for this lens.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 22 months ago from Albuquerque

      Hi. Yes, you can send pictures of the prototypes to jponic@gmail.com, might be able to look into how much they might be worth.

    • profile image

      TheBadDancer 23 months ago

      Thank you very much for letting me know. I appreciate it.

    • profile image

      Dazzurb 23 months ago

      I have some internal prototypes and was looking for an opinion on how to market them and what they might be worth...

      1. A clear plastic Mac Classic CPU. They only made a few of these to check the molds sometimes. It works too!

      2. A clear plastic version of a Mac Portable (the big heavy one)... the battery is bad so it is not working as of yet, but I'm sure it does actually work.

      3. An early prototype version of a "Fat Mac" in an European case (but with US voltage power supply). It also works. Has original Keyboard and mouse.

      4. A clear plastic prototype of the original mouse.

      5. Another probably working internal Prototype of a Mac Portable but in the normal Beige color, just marked as a prototype and not for sale etc.

      Any ideas or help will be much appreciated... I will be glad to send pictures if it will help...

      Thanks...

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 23 months ago from Albuquerque

      The Macintosh Performa 636 is worth $150.00 or less. They are not very remarkable.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 23 months ago from Albuquerque

      The 1st generation Intel iMacs are not 20 years old, you sure you bought it 20 years ago?

    • profile image

      Cate068 23 months ago

      Hello! I've been offered an iMac, OS10, 2.66 GHz Intel Core Duo with 8GB 1067 MHz DDR3 memory. It works, was bought 20 or so years ago when a print shop shut down.

      What would this be worth?

      thanks a lot!

    • profile image

      TheBadDancer 24 months ago

      Hello. I have a Macintosh Performa 636 complete, in the original packaging. I can't find anything about it anywhere. Any help/advice you can give would be greatly appreciated.

      I realize you are doing this for free in your spare time. Thank you so much!

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 24 months ago from Albuquerque

      A complete 512k System with manuals and disks will run about $500.00 these days.

    • profile image

      Ken 24 months ago

      I have a 512 Mac with all its disks, the mouse and kbc, and power cable the manuals, and the manuals package. I don't have the original shipping box, but I do have a carry case (non apple) and the computer also has a non-apple SCSI port (Dove?) with software and manual.

      I just booted it, it took several tries before it could read the floppies, but it did run. It was stored with a plastic retainer in the floppy drive.

      Any idea what it is worth?

    • profile image

      Thomarann 2 years ago

      Your advice to soak an old floppy in acetone (not acitone) is potentially dangerous as the acetone is a very strong solvent that will dissolve the glue that affixes the heads in place rendering the floppy useless. I tried this after reading it here and that is what happened so please warn people of the risks of doing this.

    • profile image

      Jackie 2 years ago

      I have a PowerMac 7200/75. It was working fine yesterday when I last used it. I've kept it defrayed so that helps. Any idea of its worth?

    • profile image

      Leon 2 years ago

      Hi Jason. I have a working Powerbook 190s with original Apple sholder carry bag, battery and charger. Was wondering what do think it it worth? Thanks

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      Do you know the model number? The only Powerbook worth serious money these days is the JLPGA because only 500 were ever produced.

    • profile image

      Gwen 2 years ago

      I have an old Apple PowerBook. Works. Gray. One of the first produced. How much is it worth? Excellent condition. Always in a case. I believe I could fine the original box.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      Any of the original iMacs are unfortunately not worth much. At best they will fetch $150.00-$300.00 on eBay.

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      Candice C. 2 years ago

      I have an original iMac (grape) purchased in 1999, with a compatible printer (Epson 740 Stylus Color). Also have a compatible Umax Astra 1220U Scanner, and Super Disk Drive. I have all of the disks, booklets, cables, etc. including the Accessories Box (complete) that came with the iMac. Looking to sell and have no idea what to ask. Any input you can offer would be greatly appreciated!

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      Hi there. I've looked around and the Apple 110 in the condition you described can fetch about $150.00. The 120 would likely fetch $100.00-$125.00.

    • profile image

      Robert H. 2 years ago

      Hey, kudos on the page....lots of good info for Apple/Mac fanatics.

      I have a Newton 110 still in the box with all of its original books, manuals, warrany card, even original Apple stickers that came in the paperwork and its in extremely good condition. I also have the 120 Model, not in its box but in a Newton branded black leather case, both the case and device are also in extremely great condition and fully functional. I also have a number of accessories, all in original packaging/boxes and complete with manuals, etc. Rechargeable battery pack..still in great condition, 2MB card, Fordo's Travel Maps software, NewtCase software, FilePad software, QuickFigure Pro, Poweforms, Notion, and Newton Utilities software. Oh, and also a second Newton branded black leather case in its box complete with paperwork and still wrapped in tissue paper. I cant even begin to tell you how much trouble Ive been having putting a value to everything but thought Id ask an expert. What do you think I could ask? I would greatly appreciate your feedback. roberthernandez31@gmail.com

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      Unfortunately the dual floppy does not add much value. The 512Ke is worth about $150.00 at top condition.

    • profile image

      g smith 2 years ago

      I have a 512k e that has the dual internal floppy disks... still works and in travel bag with KB and mouse. Haven't seen the dual disk model for sale anywhere.

      Does the dual floppy config add value?

      Thanks!

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      For a quick sale, I recommend eBay. The average selling price for a IISi is roughly $50-$100.00.

    • Holly Fuller profile image

      Holly Fuller 2 years ago

      i have a 1990 macintosh ( i think IISi) that's what the manual says. but im trying to find maybe a collector or someone, but i might just sell it on Ebay since i can't find anyone. i don't know how much it would be worth. last checked stills runs, like 20 floppy, with "kid pix", monitor, mouse keyboard (Apple), printer, other little things to go with it. I don't even really know where to start..

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      The 'clone' macs from the 1980s are tough to gauge in terms of value. A functioning Dynamac recently sold on eBay for roughly $500.00.

    • profile image

      Gabe S. 2 years ago

      I have a dynamac (black mac portable with orange screen, weighs a ton). I believe it still works. Originally cost close to 10k. Can't find info anywhere on its current worth.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      Thank you for hot linking it! The more traffic you drive to it, the more I'll maintain it!

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      Vintage Mac Museum 2 years ago

      Jason, thanks for maintaining this page, it's a valuable resource. I know how much effort this takes. Surprised to see the prices on some items, I may need to sell a few things! Keep up the good work.

      Adam Rosen

      Vintage Mac Museum

      http://vintagemacmuseum.com

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      The H1000 Newton can fetch between $100 and $400 depending on the accessories that come with it. Closer to $100 if you only have the newton and power cable. Up to $400.00 if you have multiple accessories, software, manuals and boxing.

    • profile image

      TN 2 years ago

      I have a working, decent condition Newton (H1000, original).

      I save it away for 30 years and then try to sell... does anyone know what a vintage device like that might be worth years from now?

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      The beige g3 series, one of the last beige models ever made by Apple, are worth approximately $60.00-150.00 in working condition. If it has the DVD drive it can fetch up to $300.00 but not too much higher.

    • profile image

      Nancy 2 years ago

      I have an

      apple power p c 233 MHz , 512 K cache , 32 MP , 14GB ,

      beige g3

      Model # M3979

      4/22/1998

      I Wonder if it has value and what that would be. It is in great working condition.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      The PowerBook Duo and it's dock are not worth much without the original boxes, software and packaging. As is, your system would probably fetch $150.00-$350.00 on a good day. Mint in the box, never opened or used, it would likely fetch up to $600.00. Laptop computers simply do not retain their value.

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      Mary 2 years ago

      Hello, I have a Mac computer which consists of a DuoDock with enclosed laptop that becomes a desktop when the laptop is in place. Original keyboard and mouse, I think I have all the manuals and disks but not the original cartons. Vinyl covers and HP printer not original. I bought it from a graphic designer in the mid-90s and it has an early version of PhotoShop. Last time I turned it on, everything worked. I rarely use it anymore and could use the space. Do you know what it might be worth? I checked eBay and found a couple of empty DuoDocks for sale but not the whole setup.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      You can email me at jponic@gmail.com

    • profile image

      Mark 2 years ago

      I'm writing a story on collecting vintage computers for a magazine and wanted to see if you'd be interested in answering some questions. What's the best way to reach you besides here? Any chance we can talk offline? Let me know.

    • jasonponic profile image
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      Jason Ponic 2 years ago from Albuquerque

      If you do have a mint system and are looking to cash in on its value, eBay or a collector forum website would be your best bet. Museums normally do not purchase anything. Items or collections are donated to museums.